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Xingli Giam

Assistant Professor


Research Interest

Conservation ecology, global environmental change

Education

2014 – Ph.D., Princeton University

2010 – M.Sc., National University of Singapore

2007 – B.Sc. (Hons I), National University of Singapore


Research

Conservation ecology, global environmental change, freshwater ecosystems, community assembly, macroecology, ecological statistics, socio-ecological systems, environmental psychology

Increasing anthropogenic demands for food, energy, and raw materials are driving global-scale environmental changes with profound impacts on biodiversity. Our research group focuses on characterizing and mitigating anthropogenic impacts on the environment with a particular emphasis on freshwater ecosystems. We combine fieldwork with the development and application of theoretical, statistical, and meta-analytic modeling tools to conduct interdisciplinary, policy-relevant research across multiple spatial scales.

Specific research themes include:

  • Understanding how environmental change impacts species, communities, and ecosystems, and developing effective mitigation strategies
  • Disentangling the roles of climate change and anthropogenic land-use change on biomass fires and their impact on aquatic biodiversity in Southeast Asia
  • Uncovering the effects of climate change, land-use change, dams, and invasive species on aquatic communities in the Southern Appalachians
  • Elucidating mechanisms underlying large-scale patterns of species richness, turnover, and co-occurrence to inform regional and global conservation priorities
  • Understanding human attitudes toward environmental sustainability to develop compelling conservation messages

We are currently recruiting graduate students to start in Fall 2017 or Spring 2018. Interested in finding out more? Let’s talk! Email me at giamxingli@gmail.com.


Publications

Visit Google Scholar or ResearchGate for more publications.
(*Undergraduate and **graduate student mentees)

  • Dala-Corte RB**, Giam X, Olden JD, Becker FG, Guimarães TDF, Melo AS. In Press. Revealing the pathways by which agricultural land-use affects fish communities in South Brazilian grasslands. Freshwater Biology. doi: 10.1111/fwb.12825
  • Giam X, Olden JD. 2016. Environment and predation govern fish community assembly in temperate streams. Global Ecology and Biogeography. doi: 10.1111/geb.12475
  • Giam X, Mani L*, Koh LP, Tan HTW. 2016. Saving tropical forests by knowing what we consume. Conservation Letters 9: 267–274.
  • Giam X, Olden JD. 2016. Quantifying variable importance in a multimodel inference framework. Methods in Ecology and Evolution 7: 288–397.
  • Chisholm RA, Giam X, Sadanandan KR, Fung T, Rheindt FE. 2016. A robust nonparametric method for quantifying undetected extinctions. Conservation Biology. doi: 10.1111/cobl.12640
  • Giam X, Hadiaty R, Tan HH, Parenti LR, Wowor D, Sauri S, Chong KY, Yeo DCJ, Wilcove D. 2015. Mitigating the impact of oil palm monoculture on freshwater fishes in Southeast Asia. Conservation Biology 29: 1357–1367.
  • Burivalova Z, Lee TM, Giam X, Sekercioglu CH, Wilcove DS, Koh LP. 2015. Avian responses to selective logging shaped by species traits and logging practices. Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 282: 20150164.
  • Wilcove DS, Giam X, Edwards DP, Fisher B, Koh LP. 2013. Navjot’s nightmare revisited: logging, agriculture, and biodiversity in Southeast Asia. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 28: 531–540.
  • Giam X, Koh LP, Tan HH, Miettinen J, Tan HTW, Ng PKL. 2012. Global extinctions of freshwater fishes follow peatland conversion in Sundaland. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 465-470.
  • Giam X, Scheffers BR, Sodhi NS, Wilcove DS, Ceballos G, Ehrlich PR. 2012. Reservoir of richness: least disturbed tropical forests are centres of undescribed species diversity. Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 279: 67–76.
  • Giam X, Ng TH, Lok AFSL, Ng HH. 2011. Local geographic range predicts freshwater fish extinctions in Singapore. Journal of Applied Ecology 48: 356–363.

Contact Information

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